Innovation as the fruit of embracing life as a multipotentialite

What if some people are hampered by having to narrow their focus? How might certain folks maximize their capacities by living at the intersections of their associative thinkings?

Emilie Wapnick gives a compelling talk about the nature of innovation and life as a “multipotentialite.” The three super powers of the multipotentialite may very well be the braid of new ideas strongly weaving a compelling life.

Please vote for Curiosity-based Learning to be at #SXSWedu

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What if we could create and use everyday rituals and routines to nourish people’s natural, human curiosity and build fun systems to launch innovation projects in schools and communities?!

Well, Meghan Cureton and I proposed a session for SXSWedu (in March 2016) that can do that very thing! And SXSWedu uses a platform to select proposals that includes public voting and feedback (which we think is awesome!) We need your help to spread this good idea and take it even further with collaboration from others at SXSWedu.

Please consider voting for the proposal that Meghan Cureton and I submitted to SXSWedu 2016

Curiosity-based Learning: Exploring Innovation (link)

You can read about the proposed session on SXSWedu’s Panel Picker page (link above), and you can get more details – if you are interested – from the links below.

  • Curiosity-based Learning: Exploring Innovation has just been selected to the Evolve stage on The Teachers Guild. Check it out here and here.
  • I use CBL as the core of #fsbl – “father-son-based learning.”
  • Meghan and I facilitated two half-day workshops at Traverse 2015 focused on curiosity-based learning and exploring innovation.

We’d love to share this exhilarating and change-making method with other educators and innovators. And we’d so appreciate your help in getting to SXSWedu 2016.

THANK YOU! Stay curious! Be explorers!

Exploring the circular – generating routes for future exploration

Curiosity, exploratory drive, and determined persistence define Dame Ellen MacArthur’s remarkable story of sailing the world. And while her feat was tremendous, for me it pales in comparison to the mission that her journey revealed to her. MacArthur experientially discovered that the world is, in fact, circular and not flat. From that experience and developed capacity, MacArthur poses a small set of exemplar “What if” questions from which we might all derive navigational inspiration for the courses we set and support in our own lives and work.

But what inspired me most about the circular economy was its ability to inspire young people.When young people see the economy through a circular lens, they see brand new opportunities on exactly the same horizon. They can use their creativity and knowledge to rebuild the entire system, and it’s there for the taking right now, and the faster we do this, the better.

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[Note to self: explore connection of these inspired emotions and cognitions with recent Instagram post (Amelia Island, July 5, 2015) and current reads of A Curious Mind and How We Got to Here.]

“Be an opportunity maker.” Kare Anderson #TED

Kare Anderson: Be an opportunity maker.

So here’s what I’m calling for you to do. Remember the three traits of opportunity-makers.Opportunity-makers keep honing their top strength and they become pattern seekers. They get involved in different worlds than their worlds so they’re trusted and they can see those patterns,and they communicate to connect around sweet spots of shared interest.

Participatory design for innovating on the right questions

Translating forces into forms, Alejandro Aravena shares three incredible case studies in design thinking. The forces include the voices of the users. The forms are the solutions that were collectively created by community and architect, working together through design.

Alejandro Aravena: I don’t know if you were able to read the subtitles, but you can tell from the body language that participatory design is not a hippie, romantic, let’s-all-drink-together-about- the-future-of-the-city kind of thing. It is actually — (Applause) It is actually not even with the families trying to find the right answer. It is mainly trying to identify with precision what is the right question. There is nothing worse than answering well the wrong question.

Identifying the right question — that is the value added of design thinking…”participatory design,” as Aravena calls it.

There are three great portraits of innovation in Alejandro Aravena’s “My architectural philosophy? Bring the community into the process.” And the lessons apply to so much more than just architecture? How are you bringing your community into your process?