What narrative do we hope school-age students share about “school?” #WhatIfWeekly

Summer is the time of adventures, exploring what is out in the world that you really enjoy. Then you come back to the fall with a good basic foundation to start the school year ready for action. It is almost like the true beginning of the year is the summer because it is when you really start learning and preparing for the next year. – High School (Rising) Sophomore, from her blog

It’s an interesting narrative, isn’t it? Worthy of much reflection and inquiry. Is it the narrative we educators really want school students to have? That summer is the time of adventures – the seasonal time in our annual cycle to explore in the world that which “you really enjoy?”

What if school-age students perceived school to be the time of adventures and the time to explore that which we really enjoy? What if we reverse engineered from that desired outcome? What if we backwards designed from that narrative? What if the content, competencies, and motivations (HT @DrTonyWagner) that we know to constitute deeper, lifelong learning and citizenship formed the bedrock of formalized schooling? What if play, passion, and purpose (HT #2 to @DrTonyWagner) were more deliberately woven into the tapestry of what we call the academic year? What if summer were not the sole domain of adventure and exploring “the world that you really enjoy?”

One thought on “What narrative do we hope school-age students share about “school?” #WhatIfWeekly

  1. Yay, you got what I was going for!!!!! I wanted to talk about how backwards I found this train of thought, but I couldn’t word it. So instead I was hoping someone else would catch on to the idea that school needs to be the a time of adventures too!

    I went with the reverse psychology approach; show people what the current thought process is, so that maybe they can see the possible for themselves.

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