#MustRead Shares (weekly)

  • “Gardner’s theory initially listed seven intelligences which  work together: linguistic, logical-mathematical,  musical,  bodily-kinesthetic, spatial, interpersonal and intrapersonal; he later added an eighth, naturalist intelligence and says there may be a few more.  The theory became highly popular with K-12 educators around the world seeking ways to reach students who did not respond to traditional approaches, but over time, “multiple intelligences” somehow became synonymous with the concept of “learning styles.” In this important post, Gardner explains why the former is not the latter.”

    tags: multipleintelligences Gardner learningstyles multiple_intelligences learning_styles #MustRead

  • “… anew breed of educators, inspired by everything from the Internet to evolutionary psychology, neuroscience, and AI, are inventing radical new ways for children to learn, grow, and thrive. To them, knowledge isn’t a commodity that’s delivered from teacher to student but something that emerges from the students’ own curiosity-fueled exploration. Teachers provide prompts, not answers, and then they step aside so students can teach themselves and one another. They are creating ways for children to discover their passion—and uncovering a generation of geniuses in the process.”

    HT @JamieReverb

    tags: sugata_mitra StudentCentered Control pedagogy School Change #MustRead innovation Curriculum engagement passion

    • “The bottom line is, if you’re not the one controlling your learning, you’re not going to learn as well.”
    • But when scientists build machines that are programmed to try a variety of motions and learn from mistakes, the robots become far more adaptable and skilled. The same principle applies to children, she says.
    • Peter Gray, a research professor at Boston College who studies children’s natural ways of learning, argues that human cognitive machinery is fundamentally incompatible with conventional schooling.
    • Gray points out that young children, motivated by curiosity and playfulness, teach themselves a tremendous amount about the world. And yet when they reach school age, we supplant that innate drive to learn with an imposed curriculum. “We’re teaching the child that his questions don’t matter, that what matters are the questions of the curriculum. That’s just not the way natural selection designed us to learn. It designed us to solve problems and figure things out that are part of our real lives.”
    • taught the kids about democracy by letting them elect leaders who would decide how to run the class and address discipline.
    • letting children “wander aimlessly around ideas.”
    • higher graduation rate than the city’s average for the same populations. They do it by emphasizing student-led learning and collaboration
    • Now that our society and economy have evolved beyond that era, our schools must also be reinvented.
    • “Intelligence comes from necessity,”

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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