#MustRead Shares (weekly)

  • tags: brands responsibility #MustRead

  • tags: learning changing leadership #MustRead Brainfood

  • tags: school reform business-education partnership #MustRead

  • tags: school model unschooling #MustRead

  • tags: design innovation #MustRead

  • tags: blueprint malaysia schools of the future future of schools #MustRead 21C

    • Wave 1 (2012-2015) focusing on efforts to turn around the system by supporting teachers and focusing on core skills
    • education transformation is to take place over 13 years
    • Wave 2 (2016-2020) on accelerating system improvement
    • Wave 3 (2021-2025) on moving towards excellence with increased operational flexibility.
    • access, quality, equity, unity and efficiency.
    • six key attributes that will enable them to be globally competitive
    • knowledge, thinking skills, leadership skills, bilingual proficiency, ethics and spirituality, as well as national identity.
      • Reminds me of Gardner’s Five Minds for the Future
    • 1. Provide equal access to quality education of an international standard.

    • 2. Ensure every child is proficient in Bahasa Malaysia and English language.

    • 3. Develop values-driven Malaysians.

    • 4. Transform teaching into the profession of choice.

    • 5. Ensure high-performing school leaders in every school.

    • 6. Empower State Education Departments, District Education Offices and schools to customise solutions based on need.

    • 7. Leverage information and communication technology to scale up quality learning across Malaysia.

    • 8. Transform ministry delivery capabilities and capacity.

    • 9. Partner with parents, community and private sector at scale.

    • 10. Maximise student outcomes for every ringgit.

    • 11. Increase transparency for direct public accountability.

    • Over the course of a year, over 50,000 ministry officials, teachers, principals, parents, students and members of the public across Malaysia were engaged via interviews, focus groups, surveys, and National Dialogue townhall and roundtable discussions.
  • Our students want to become innovators. Our economy needs them to become innovators. The question is: As educators, do we have the courage to disrupt conventional wisdom and pursue the innovations that matter most?

    Third, to push educational innovation, districts need to partner with one another, businesses, and nonprofits to establish true R&D labs—schools of choice that are developing 21st-century approaches to learning.

    tags: education innovation schools of the future future of schools school model UnbouBrainFood #MustRead Brainfood

    • need to develop ways to assess essential skills with digital portfolios that follow students through school
    • assess teachers’ effectiveness by analysis of their students’ work, rather than on the basis of a test score. Teachers and administrators should also build digital portfolios
    • Third, to push educational innovation, districts need to partner with one another, businesses, and nonprofits to establish true R&D labs—schools of choice that are developing 21st-century approaches to learning.
    • we need to incorporate a better understanding of how students are motivated to do their best work into our course and school designs. Google has a 20 percent rule, whereby all employees have the equivalent of one day a week to work on any project they choose. These projects have produced many of Google’s most important innovations. I would like to see this same rule applied to every classroom in America, as a way to create time for students to pursue their own interests and continue to develop their sense of play, passion, and purpose.
    • Our students want to become innovators. Our economy needs them to become innovators. The question is: As educators, do we have the courage to disrupt conventional wisdom and pursue the innovations that matter most?
  • tags: innovation colorado academy school model EdJourney #MustRead

  • Dewey: “The world in which most of us live is a world in which everyone has a calling and occupation, something to do,” he wrote. “Some are managers and others are subordinates. But the great thing for one as for the other is that each shall have had the education which enables him to see within his daily work all there is in it of large and human significance.”

    tags: education learning freedom Dewey edreform purpose of education #MustRead

    • From this narrow, instrumentalist perspective, students are consumers buying a customized playlist of knowledge
    • philosopher John Dewey, America’s most influential thinker on education, opposed this effort. Though he was open to integrating manual training in school curriculums, Dewey opposed the dual-track system because he recognized that it would reinforce the inequalities of his time. Wouldn’t such a system have the same result today?
    • Education should aim to enhance our capacities, Dewey argued, so that we are not reduced to mere tools.
    • Dewey had a different vision. Given the pace of change, it is impossible (he noted in 1897) to know what the world will be like in a couple of decades, so schools first and foremost should teach us habits of learning.
    • awareness of our interdependence
    • “The inclination to learn from life itself and to make the conditions of life such that all will learn in the process of living is the finest product of schooling.”
    • The inclination to learn from life can be taught in a liberal arts curriculum, but also in schools that focus on real-world skills, from engineering to nursing. The key is to develop habits of mind that allow students to keep learning, even as they acquire skills to get things done. This combination will serve students as individuals, family members and citizens — not just as employees and managers.
      • Yes, the “key is to develop habits of mind that allow students to keep learning.” However, the type of learning for the future is more expansive than the brand of learning provided in many schools. 
    • Dewey’s insight that learning in the process of living is the deepest form of freedom
    • In a nation that aspires to democracy, that’s what education is primarily for: the cultivation of freedom within society
    • higher education’s highest purpose is to give all citizens the opportunity to find “large and human significance” in their lives and work.
      • Are we? Are we giving all citizens the opportunity to find large and human significance in their lives and work?
  • tags: nytimes com friedman edreform #MustRead

  • tags: edreform ActionEd future of schools curriculum #MustRead Brainfood

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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