#MustRead Shares (weekly)

  • tags: innovation design #MustRead brainfood

  • tags: leadership clarity paradox #MustRead brain food UnbouBrainFood

    • “the clarity paradox,” which can be summed up in four predictable phases:

        

      Phase 1: When we really have clarity of purpose, it leads to success.
       Phase 2: When we have success, it leads to more options and opportunities.
       Phase 3: When we have increased options and opportunities, it leads to diffused efforts.
       Phase 4: Diffused efforts undermine the very clarity that led to our success in the first place.

    • Curiously, and overstating the point in order to make it, success is a catalyst for failure.
    • one of the key reasons for these failures was that companies fell into “the undisciplined pursuit of more.”
    • What can we do to avoid the clarity paradox and continue our upward momentum? Here are three suggestions:
    • First, use more extreme criteria.
    • Second, ask “What is essential?” and eliminate the rest.
    • Third, beware of the endowment effect.
    • If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less.
  • Massive open online courses (MOOCs), such as those offered by Coursera, are particularly intriguing in that they help democratize education.

    tags: online learning online_education online education #MustRead universities

    • Massive open online courses (MOOCs), such as those offered by Coursera, are particularly intriguing in that they help democratize education.
    • Still, there is much to be said in defense of the real-world classroom
    • Is there any intrinsic value to being bodily present in the classroom?
    • Students learn not only from engaging with ideas, but also by engaging each other.
    • Online education raises exciting possibilities for universities. MOOCs democratize educational access. But democratic education is also about habituating ourselves to encounter our fellow citizens, to disagree passionately and to tolerate disagreement. Traditional liberal arts classrooms democratize education not in quantitative terms, but in quality of access to Others.
  • According to the National Venture Capital Association, investment in education technology companies increased from less than $100 million in 2007 to nearly $400 million last year. For the huge generator of innovation, technology, and wealth that is Silicon Valley, higher education is a particularly fat target right now.

    tags: education technology disruption university online education online_education #MustRead brainfood

    • According to the National Venture Capital Association, investment in education technology companies increased from less than $100 million in 2007 to nearly $400 million last year. For the huge generator of innovation, technology, and wealth that is Silicon Valley, higher education is a particularly fat target right now.
    • The ongoing carnage in the newspaper industry provides an object lesson of what can happen when a long-established, information-focused industry’s business model is challenged by low-price competitors online.
    • The recent surge of money into higher education startups reflects growing interest in the category.
    • Is the real money to be made, per Marc Andreessen, in eating the existing education industry? Or will it be in providing service to the industry, helping them do what they do better? In terms popularized by Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen, this is the difference between “disruptive” and “sustaining” innovation.
    • So the VC guys and the start-ups look at K-12 and higher education, which between them cost over $1 trillion per year in America, and much more around the world. They see businesses that are organized around communication between people and the exchange of information, two things that are increasingly happening over the Internet. Right now, nearly all of that communication and exchange happens on physical platforms—schools and colleges—that were built a long time ago. A huge amount of money is tied up in labor and business arrangements that depend on things staying that way. How likely are they to stay that way, in the long term? Sure, there are a ton of regulatory protections and political complications tied up in the fact that most education is funded by the taxpayer. As always, the timing would be difficult, and there is as much risk in being too early as too late.
    • To drive home the point of just how cheap it is to be Quizlet, one of its executives asks me how much money the United States spends per year to educate a single student in K-12 education. About $15,000, I say. That’s more than what it costs us per month to host the entire site, serving millions,
    • In less than a year, online higher education has gone from the province of downmarket for-profit colleges to being embraced by the most famous universities in the world.
    • We may not know who and we may not know when, but someone is going to write the software that eats higher education.
    • Older models often adapt and endure in significant if less important forms.
  • tags: school reform strategy business #MustRead Senge UnbouBrainFood brainfood

  • tags: climate science culture social innovation #MustRead brainfood

    • Today, there is no doubt that a scientific consensus exists on the issue  of climate change
    • And yet a social consensus on climate change does not exist
    • answers to this question can be  found, not from the physical sciences, but from the social science  disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, and others.
    • people’s opinions  on this and other complex scientific issues are based on their  prior ideological preferences, personal experience, and values—all  of which are heavily influenced by their referent groups and their  individual psychology.
    • We must acknowledge  that the debate over climate change, like almost all environmental  issues, is a debate over culture, worldviews, and ideology
      • The debate over school change must also be over culture, world views, and ideology.
    • Political affiliation is one of the strongest correlates  with individual uncertainty about climate change, not scientific  knowledge.
      • I wonder what the analogue is to education and the issue of school transformation? “Political affiliation is one of the strongest correlates with individual uncertainty about climate change, not scientific knowledge.”
    • “logic schism,”  a breakdown in debate in which opposing sides are talking about  completely different cultural issues.
  • tags: algebra STEM #MustRead

    • We can teach people the skills they need if we allow them to choose what interests them and then teach them to predict, evaluate, diagnose, etc., within their area of interest.
  • tags: School Change Big Shifts NAIS schools of the future #MustRead

  • tags: steam stem #MustRead

  • tags: culture #MustRead

  • tags: 21st 21C 21stcenturylearning brainfood #MustRead

  • tags: education brainfood UnbouBrainFood #MustRead schools of the future Change

    • although there are some encouraging signs of change, several major challenges stand out from my ongoing discussions with today’s 11-13 year olds.
    • A disconnect between the way school works and how they function outside school.
    • We are not preparing these kids for the world as it operates today.
    • Boredom with the teacher-centered learning process.
    • Shifting sources of authority.
    • new role for teachers (and parents): that of a learning facilitator and coach, rather than of an authoritative source of information.
    • Growing interest in pragmatic, job-oriented skills.
    • Unease regarding global standing.
    • Thurow argued that the most significant invention in U.S. history was the public education system established in the early days of the industrial revolution.
    • Thurow argues that this unique educational system produced a workforce that was perfectly matched — in both skills and behavior — to the burgeoning needs of the new industrial economy.
    • Students emerging from this system had both the right knowledge (reading, math) to perform the industrial jobs and the right behaviors (punctuality, focus on specific linear tasks) to form an efficient industrial workforce.
    • modeled both on the interests of industrialization and in the image of it: specialization into separate subjects, standardized curricula, conformity, batch processing — by age group. The system was designed to leverage a “lock step” approach over set periods of time and using broadcast delivery methods to prepare students effectively for known jobs.
    • our current approach to education was designed for a different age
    • we all know, most of the jobs of tomorrow will not be industrial jobs.
    • gap between the output of our educational system and the job demands of the current century is enormous — and growing wider.
    • kids intuitively recognize the gap. They’re asking for a change.
  • tags: nytimes com social media balance #MustRead

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

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